You may have noticed that in street fashion shops, more and more hangers are sportswear, which is mainly environmentally friendly. Organic cotton, bamboo and even recycled plastics are turning into clothes for Eco conscious fashion people. Australia’s Nanollose will use a more environmentally friendly way to make use of the biomass waste from the coconut industry to produce plant free fiber, which is much less environmental than the widely used textiles (such as cotton).

Microbial cellulose can be changed into an environmentally friendly fabric

The raw materials used to make most of today’s textiles require a large amount of agricultural land for plant production, not to mention a large amount of chemicals used to prevent pests and process fiber, and many precious water. In order to create artificial fibers currently used for clothing, it is necessary to cut down numerous trees,shredding and then treat wood pulp with dangerous chemicals. It takes 2700 liters of water to make enough cotton for a T-shirt, equivalent to two and a half years of water for one person to intake.

Microbial cellulose can be changed into an environmentally friendly fabric

Nanollose uses organic waste to produce sustainable fibers, called Nullarbor. The company says cellulose nanofibers are produced by microorganisms that convert biomass waste into cellulose. The process does not need to cut down trees or use arable land, and it takes less than a month.

Microbial cellulose can be changed into an environmentally friendly fabric

The company currently uses coconut by-products from Indonesia, which is synthesized and converted into usable rayon fiber, provided by the company’s proprietary technology. It is said that the existing industrial resources are sufficient for production in the pilot phase of the project, but Nanollose intends to take advantage of the waste of large industry at the beginning of all production.

Microbial cellulose can be changed into an environmentally friendly fabric

It is possible to convert a large amount of biomass waste into fiber in beer, wine and liquid food industry, in which only a small amount of land, water or energy is needed.